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pISSN 2234-7518 eISSN 2005-372X

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< PreviousNext >Korean J Orthod 2020; 50(2): 73~154
  • Reader’s Forum 2020-03-25

  • Original Article 2020-03-25

    Short-term impact of microimplant-assisted rapid palatal expansion on the nasal soft tissues in adults: A three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry study

    Seung-Ryeol Lee, Jin-woo Lee, Dong-Hwa Chung and Sang-min Lee

    Abstract : ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the nasal soft tissues, including movements of landmarks, changes in linear distances, and volumetric changes, using three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry after microimplant-assisted rapid palatal expansion (MARPE) in adult patients.MethodsFacial data were scanned using a white light scanner before and after MARPE in 30 patients. In total, 7 mm of expansion was achieved over a 4-week expansion period. We determined 10 soft tissue landmarks using reverse engineering software and measured 3D vector changes at those points. In addition, we calculated the distances between points to determine changes in the width of the nasal soft tissues. The volumetric change in the nose was also measured.ResultsAll landmarks except pronasale and subnasale showed statistically significant movement on the x-axis. Pronasale, subnasale, alar right, and alar left showed significant movement on the y-axis, while all landmarks except subnasale showed significant movement on the z-axis. The alar base width, alar width, and alar curvature width increased by 1.214, 0.932, and 0.987 mm, respectively. The average volumetric change was 993.33 mm3, and the amount of increase relative to the average initial volume was 2.96%.ConclusionsThe majority of soft tissue landmarks around the nasal region show significant positional changes after MARPE in adults. The nose tends to widen and move forward and downward. The post-treatment nasal volume may also exhibit a significant increase relative to the initial volume. Clinicians should thoroughly explain the anticipated changes to patients before MARPE initiation.

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  • Original Article 2020-03-25

    Three-dimensional cone beam computed tomography analysis of temporomandibular joint response to the Twin-block functional appliance

    Yuan-yuan Jiang, Lian Sun, Hua Wang, Chun-yang Zhao, and Wei-Bing Zhang

    Abstract : ObjectiveTo propose a three-dimensional (3D) method for evaluating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes during Twin-block treatment.MethodsSeventeen patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion treated using Twin-block and nine untreated patients with a similar malocclusion were included in this research. We collected their cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data from before and 8 months after treatment. Segmentations were constructed using ITK-SNAP. Condylar volume and superficial area were measured using 3D Slicer. The 3D landmarks were identified on CBCT images by using Dolphin software to assess the condylar positional relationship. 3D models of the mandible and glenoid fossa of the patients were constructed and registered via voxel-based superimposition using 3D Slicer. Thereafter, skeletal changes could be visualized using 3DMeshMetric in any direction of the superimposition on a color-coded map. All the superimpositions were measured using the same scale on the distance color-coded map, in which red color represents overgrowth and blue color represents resorption.ResultsSignificant differences were observed in condylar volume, superficial area, and condylar position in both groups after 8 months. Compared with the control group (CG), the Twin-block group exhibited more obvious condyle-fossa modifications and joint positional changes. Moreover, on the color-coded map, more obvious condyle-fossa modifications could be observed in the posterior and superior directions in the Twin-block group than in the CG.ConclusionsWe successfully established a 3D method for measuring and evaluating TMJ changes caused by Twin-block treatment. The treatment produced a larger condylar size and caused condylar positional changes.

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  • Original Article 2020-03-25

    Posterior dental compensation and occlusal function in adults with different sagittal skeletal malocclusions

    Soonshin Hwang, Yoon Jeong Choi, Sooin Jung, Sujin Kim, Chooryung J. Chung, and Kyung-Ho Kim

    Abstract : ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to compare posterior tooth inclinations, occlusal force, and contact area of adults with different sagittal malocclusions.MethodsTransverse skeletal parameters and posterior tooth inclinations were evaluated using cone beam computed tomography images, and occlusal force as well as contact area were assessed using pressure-sensitive films in 124 normodivergent adults. A linear mixed model was used to cluster posterior teeth into maxillary premolar, maxillary molar, mandibular premolar, and mandibular molar groups. Differences among Class I, II, and III groups were compared using an analysis of variance test and least significant difference post-hoc test. Correlations of posterior dental inclinations to occlusal function were analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis.ResultsIn male subjects, maxillary premolars and molars had the smallest inclinations in the Class II group while maxillary molars had the greatest inclinations in the Class III group. In female subjects, maxillary molars had the smallest inclinations in the Class II group, while maxillary premolars and molars had the greatest inclinations in the Class III group. Occlusal force and contact area were not significantly different among Class I, II, and III groups.ConclusionsPremolar and molar inclinations showed compensatory inclinations to overcome anteroposterior skeletal discrepancy in the Class II and III groups; however, their occlusal force and contact area were similar to those of Class I group. In subjects with normodivergent facial patterns, although posterior tooth inclinations may vary, difference in occlusal function may be clinically insignificant in adults with Class I, II, and III malocclusions.

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  • Original Article 2020-03-25

    Sex-, growth pattern-, and growth status-related variability in maxillary and mandibular buccal cortical thickness and density

    Sydney Schneider, Vaibhav Gandhi, Madhur Upadhyay, Veerasathpurush Allareddy, Aditya Tadinada, and Sumit Yadav

    Abstract : ObjectiveThe primary objective of this study was to quantitatively analyze the bone parameters (thickness and density) at four different interdental areas from the distal region of the canine to the mesial region of the second molar in the maxilla and the mandible. The secondary aim was to compare and contrast the bone parameters at these specific locations in terms of sex, growth status, and facial type.MethodsThis retrospective cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) study reviewed 290 CBCT images of patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Cortical bone thickness in millimeters (mm) and density in pixel intensity value were measured for the regions (1) between the canine and first premolar, (2) between the first and second premolars, (3) between the second premolar and first molar, and (4) between the first and second molars. At each location, the bone thickness and density were measured at distances of 2, 6, and 10 mm from the alveolar crest.ResultsThe sex comparison (male vs. female) in cortical bone thickness showed no significant difference (p > 0.001). The bone density in growing subjects was significantly (p < 0.001) lower than that in non-growing subjects for most locations. There was no significant difference (p > 0.001) in bone parameters in relation to facial pattern in the maxilla and mandible for most sites.ConclusionsThere was no significant sex-related difference in cortical bone thickness. The buccal cortical bone density was higher in females than in males. Bone parameters were similar for subjects with hyperdivergent, hypodivergent, and normodivergent facial patterns.

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  • Original Article 2020-03-25

    Changes in maximum lip-closing force after extraction and nonextraction orthodontic treatments

    Tae-Hyun Choi, So-Hyun Kim, Cheul Kim, Yoon-Ah Kook, Brent E. Larson, and Nam-Ki Lee

    Abstract : ObjectiveThe aims of the present study were to evaluate the changes in the maximum lip-closing force (MLF) after orthodontic treatment with or without premolar extractions and verify the correlation of these changes with dentoskeletal changes.MethodsIn total, 17 women who underwent nonextraction orthodontic treatment and 15 women who underwent orthodontic treatment with extraction of all four first premolars were included in this retrospective study. For all patients, lateral cephalograms and dental models were measured before (T0) and after (T1) treatment. In addition, MLF was measured at both time points using the Lip De Cum LDC-110R? device. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate changes in clinical variables and MLF and their correlations.ResultsBoth groups showed similar skeletal patterns, although the extraction group showed greater proclination of the maxillary and mandibular incisors and lip protrusion compared to the nonextraction group at T0. MLF at T0 was comparable between the two groups. The reduction in the arch width and depth and incisor retroclination from T0 to T1 were more pronounced in the extraction group than in the nonextraction group. MLF in the extraction group significantly increased during the treatment period, and this increase was significantly greater than that in the nonextraction group. The increase in MLF was found to be correlated with the increase in the interincisal angle and decrease in the intermolar width, arch depth, and incisor?mandibular plane angle.ConclusionsThis study suggests that MLF increases to a greater extent during extraction orthodontic treatment than during nonextraction orthodontic treatment.

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  • Original Article 2020-03-25

    Immediate effects of mandibular posterior displacement on the pharyngeal airway space: A preliminary study

    Yeonju Choi, Yong-Il Kim, Seong-Sik Kim, Soo-Byung Park, Woo-Sung Son and Sung-Hun Kim

    Abstract : ObjectiveThis study aimed to evaluate the immediate effects of mandibular posterior displacement on the pharyngeal airway space (PAS) by using cephalometric evaluations and to investigate how the surrounding structures are schematically involved.MethodsIn this retrospective study, 38 subjects with functional Class III malocclusion and two lateral cephalograms were selected. The first lateral cephalogram was taken with the mandible in the habitual occlusal position, and the second in anterior edge-to-edge bite. Paired t-test was used to analyze changes in the PAS, hyoid bone, tongue, and soft palate, followed by mandibular posterior displacement. Pearson's correlation analysis was used to determine the relationship between the amount of mandibular posterior displacement and other variables.ResultsA statistically significant decrease was observed in the PAS following mandibular posterior displacement. Along with mandibular posterior displacement, the tongue decreased in length (p < 0.001) and increased in height (p < 0.05), while the soft palate increased in length, decreased in thickness, and was posteriorly displaced (p < 0.001). The hyoid bone was also posteriorly displaced (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between the amount of mandibular posterior displacement and the measured variables.ConclusionsThe PAS showed a statistically significant decrease following mandibular posterior displacement, which was a consequence of retraction of the surrounding structures. However, there were individual variances between the amount of mandibular posterior displacement and the measured variables.

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  • Case Report 2020-03-25

    Growth observation and orthodontic treatment of a hemifacial microsomia patient treated with distraction osteogenesis

    Nam Hyung Chung, So Jin Yang, Jae Yoen Kang, Young-Mi Jeon, and Jong Ghee Kim

    Abstract : Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) patients may experience emotional withdrawal during their growth period due to their abnormal facial appearance. Distraction osteogenesis at an early age to improve their appearance can encourage these patients. Some abnormalities of the affected side can be overcome by distraction osteogenesis at an early age. However, differences in the growth rate between the affected and unaffected sides during the rest of the growth period are inevitable due to the characteristics of HFM. Therefore, re-evaluation should be performed after completion of growth in order to achieve stable occlusion through either orthognathic surgery or camouflage orthodontic treatment. An eight-year-old patient visited the clinic exhibiting features of HFM with slight mandibular involvement. He received phase I treatment with distraction osteogenesis and a functional appliance. Distraction osteogenesis was performed at the right ramus, which resulted in an open bite at the right posterior dentition. After distraction osteogenesis, a functional appliance and partial fixed appliance were used to achieve extrusion of the affected posterior dentition and settlement of the occlusion adjustment on the unaffected posterior dentition. The patient visited the clinic regularly for follow-up assessments, and at the age of 20 years, he showed facial asymmetry of the mandible, which had deviated to the right side. He received orthodontic treatment to improve the occlusion of his posterior dentition after the growth period. Without orthognathic surgery, stable occlusion and a satisfactory facial appearance were obtained through camouflage orthodontic treatment.

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  • Case Report 2020-03-25

    Protraction of mandibular molars through a severely atrophic edentulous space in a case of juvenile periodontitis

    Jian-chao Wu, Yu-ting Zheng, and Yi-jun Dai

    Abstract : Moving the mandibular posterior teeth into a severely atrophic edentulous space is a challenge. A carefully designed force-and-moment system that results in bodily protraction of the posterior teeth with balanced bone resorption and apposition is needed in such cases. This report describes the treatment of a 19-year-old woman with missing mandibular first molars due to juvenile periodontitis. Miniscrews were used as absolute anchorage during protraction of the mandibular second and third molars. Bodily mesial movement of the mandibular second and third molars was achieved over a distance of 11 to 17 mm after 39 months of orthodontic treatment.

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Vol.50 No.5

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pISSN 2234-7518 eISSN 2005-372X

2018 Impact Factor
1.476
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