KJO Open Access, Peer-reviewed, Bimonthly

pISSN 2234-7518 eISSN 2005-372X

September 25, 2020Current Issue Vol. 50 No. 5

    September, 2020 | Volume 50, No. 5
  • Reader's Forum 2020-09-25

  • Original Article 2020-09-25

    Three-dimensional surgical accuracy between virtually planned and actual surgical movements of the maxilla in two-jaw orthognathic surgery

    Mihee Hong , Myung-Jin Kim, Hye Jung Shin et al.

    Abstract : Objective: To investigate the three-dimensional (3D) surgical accuracy between virtually planned and actual surgical movements (SM) of the maxilla in twojaw orthognathic surgery. Methods: The sample consisted of 15 skeletal Class III patients who underwent two-jaw orthognathic surgery performed by a single surgeon using a virtual surgical simulation (VSS) software. The 3D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained before (T0) and after surgery (T1). After merging the dental cast image onto the T0 CBCT image, VSS was performed. SM were classified into midline correction (anterior and posterior), advancement, setback, anterior elongation, and impaction (total and posterior). The landmarks were the midpoint between the central incisors, the mesiobuccal cusp tip (MBCT) of both first molars, and the midpoint of the two MBCTs. The amount and direction of SM by VSS and actual surgery were measured using 3D coordinates of the landmarks. Discrepancies less than 1 mm between VSS and T1 landmarks indicated a precise outcome. The surgical achievement percentage (SAP, [amount of movement in actual surgery/ amount of movement in VSS] × 100) (%) and precision percentage (PP, [number of patients with precise outcome/number of total patients] × 100) (%) were compared among SM types using Fisher’s exact and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Results: Overall mean discrepancy between VSS and actual surgery, SAP, and PP were 0.13 mm, 89.9%, and 68.3%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the SAP and PP values among the seven SM types (all p > 0.05). Conclusions: VSS could be considered as an effective tool for increasing surgical accuracy.

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  • Original Article 2020-09-25

    Stability of bimaxillary surgery involving intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy with or without presurgical miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion in adult patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    Yoon-Soo Ahn , Sung-Hwan Choi , Kee-Joon Lee et al.

    Abstract : Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of bimaxillary surgery involving bilateral intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy performed with or without presurgical miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion (MARPE) in adult patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Methods: A total of 40 adult patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were retrospectively divided into two groups (n = 20 each) according to the use of MARPE for the correction of transverse maxillomandibular discrepancy during presurgical orthodontic treatment. Serial lateral cephalograms and dental casts were analyzed until 6 months after surgery. Results: Before presurgical orthodontic treatment, there was no significant differences in terms of sex and age between groups. However, the difference of approximately 3.1 mm in the maxillomandibular intermolar width was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Two days after surgery, the mandible had moved backward and upward without any significant intergroup difference. Six months after surgery, the maxillary intercanine (2.7 ± 2.1 mm), interpremolar (3.6 ± 2.4 mm), and intermolar (2.0 ± 1.3 mm) arch widths were significantly increased (p < 0.001) relative to the values before presurgical orthodontic treatment in the MARPE group; these widths were maintained or decreased in the control group. However, there was no significant difference in surgical changes and the postsurgical stability between the two groups. No significant correlations existed between the amount of maxillary expansion and postsurgical mandibular movement. Conclusions: MARPE is useful for stable and nonsurgical expansion of the maxilla in adult patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion who are scheduled for bimaxillary surgery.

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  • Original Article 2020-09-25

    Short-term treatment effects produced by rapid maxillary expansion evaluated with computed tomography: A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Antonino Lo Giudice , Paola Spinuzza, Lorenzo Rustico et al.

    Abstract : Objective: To identify the available evidence on the effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) with three-dimensional imaging and provide meta-analytic data from studies assessing the outcomes using computed tomography. Methods: Eleven electronic databases were searched, and prospective case series were selected. Two authors screened all titles and abstracts and assessed full texts of the remaining articles. Seventeen case series were included in the quantitative synthesis. Seven outcomes were investigated: nasal cavity width, maxillary basal bone width, alveolar buccal crest width, alveolar palatal crest width, inter-molar crown width, inter-molar root apex width, and buccopalatal molar inclination. The outcomes were investigated at two-time points: postexpansion (2–6 weeks) and post-retention (4–8 months). Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were used to summarize and combine the data. Results: All the investigated outcomes showed significant differences postexpansion (maxillary basal bone width, +2.46 mm; nasal cavity width, +1.95 mm; alveolar buccal crest width, +3.90 mm; alveolar palatal crest width, +3.09 mm; intermolar crown width, +5.69 mm; inter-molar root apex width, +2.85 mm; and dental tipping, +3.75°) and post-retention (maxillary basal bone width, +2.21 mm; nasal cavity width, +1.55 mm; alveolar buccal crest width, +3.57 mm; alveolar palatal crest width, +3.32 mm; inter-molar crown width, +5.43 mm; inter-molar root apex width, +4.75 mm; and dental tipping, 2.22°) compared to pre-expansion. Conclusions: After RME, skeletal expansion of the nasomaxillary complex was greater in most caudal structures. Maxillary basal bone showed 10% post-retention relapse. During retention period, uprighting of maxillary molars occurred.

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  • Original Article 2020-09-25

    Positional changes in the mandibular proximal segment after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy: Surgery-first approach versus conventional approach

    Seoyeon Jung , Yunjin Choi, Jung-Hyun Park et al.

    Abstract : Objective: To compare postoperative positional changes in the mandibular proximal segment between the conventional orthognathic surgery (CS) and the surgery-first approach (SF) using intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) in patients with Class III malocclusion. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion who underwent bimaxillary surgery were divided into two groups according to the use of preoperative orthodontic treatment: CS group (n = 18) and SF group (n = 20). Skeletal changes in both groups were measured using computed tomography before (T0), 2 days after (T1), and 1 year after (T2) the surgery. Three-dimensional (3D) angular changes in the mandibular proximal segment, condylar position, and maxillomandibular landmarks were assessed. Results: The mean amounts of mandibular setback and maxillary posterior impaction were similar in both groups. At T2, the posterior portion of the mandible moved upward in both groups. In the SF group, the anterior portion of the mandible moved upward by a mean distance of 0.9 ± 1.0 mm, which was statistically significant (p < 0.001). There were significant between-group differences in occlusal changes (p < 0.001) as well as in overjet and overbite. However, there were no significant between-group differences in proximal segment variables. Conclusions: Despite postoperative occlusal changes, positional changes in the mandibular proximal segment and the position of the condyles were similar between CS and SF, which suggested that SF using IVRO achieved satisfactory postoperative stability. If active physiotherapy is conducted, the proximal segment can be adapted in the physiological position regardless of the occlusal changes.

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  • Original Article 2020-09-25

    Treatment modalities for Korean patients with unilateral hemifacial microsomia according to Pruzansky–Kaban types and growth stages

    Il-Hyung Yang , Jee Hyeok Chung , Sunjin Yim et al.

    Abstract : Objective: To investigate the treatment modalities (Tx-Mods) for patients with unilateral hemifacial microsomia (UHFM) according to Pruzansky–Kaban types and growth stages. Methods: The samples consisted of 82 Korean UHFM patients. Tx-Mods were defined as follows: Tx-Mod-1, growth observation due to mild facial asymmetry; Tx-Mod-2, unilateral functional appliance; Tx- Mod-3, fixed orthodontic treatment; Tx-Mod-4, growth observation due to a definite need for surgical intervention; Tx-Mod-5, unilateral mandibular or bimaxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO); Tx-Mod-6, maxillary fixation using LeFort I osteotomy and mandibular DO/sagittal split ramus osteotomy; Tx- Mod-7, orthognathic surgery; and Tx-Mod-8, costochondral grafting. The type and frequency of Tx-Mod, the number of patients who underwent surgical procedures, and the number of surgeries that each patient underwent, were investigated. Results: The degree of invasiveness and complexity of Tx-Mod increased, with an increase in treatment stage and Pruzansky–Kaban type (initial < final; [I, IIa] < [IIb, III], all p < 0.001). The percentage of patients who underwent surgical procedures increased up to 4.2 times, with an increase in the Pruzansky–Kaban type (I, 24.1%; IIa, 47.1%; IIb, 84.4%; III, 100%; p < 0.001). However, the mean number of surgical procedures that each patient underwent showed a tendency of increase according to the Pruzansky–Kaban types (I, n = 1.1; IIa, n = 1.5; IIb, n = 1.6; III, n = 2.3; p > 0.05). Conclusions: These findings might be used as basic guidelines for successful treatment planning and prognosis prediction in UHFM patients.

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  • Case Report 2020-09-25

    Maxillary protraction using customized mini-plates for anchorage in an adolescent girl with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    Shuran Liang , Xianju Xie, Fan Wang et al.

    Abstract : The treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion in adolescents is challenging. Maxillary protraction, particularly that using bone anchorage, has been proven to be an effective method for the stimulation of maxillary growth. However, the conventional procedure, which involves the surgical implantation of mini-plates, is traumatic and associated with a high risk. Three-dimensional (3D) digital technology offers the possibility of individualized treatment. Customized miniplates can be designed according to the shape of the maxillary surface and the positions of the roots on cone-beam computed tomography scans; this reduces both the surgical risk and patient trauma. Here we report a case involving a 12-year-old adolescent girl with skeletal Class III malocclusion and midface deficiency that was treated in two phases. In phase 1, rapid maxillary expansion and protraction were performed using 3D-printed mini-plates for anchorage. The mini-plates exhibited better adaptation to the bone contour, and titanium screw implantation was safer because of the customized design. The orthopedic force applied to each mini-plate was approximately 400–500 g, and the plates remained stable during the maxillary protraction process, which exhibited efficacious orthopedic effects and significantly improved the facial profile and esthetics. In phase 2, fixed appliances were used for alignment and leveling of the maxillary and mandibular dentitions. The complete two-phase treatment lasted for 24 months. After 48 months of retention, the treatment outcomes remained stable.

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  • Brief Report 2020-09-25

    The six geometries revisited

    Austin Kang , Marino Musilli, Mauro Farella

    Abstract : Forces and moments delivered by a straight wire connecting two orthodontic brackets are statically indeterminate and cannot be estimated using the classical equations of static equilibrium. To identify the mechanics of such two-bracket systems, Burstone and Koenig used the principles of linear beam theory to estimate the resulting force systems. In the original publication, however, it remains unclear how the force systems were calculated because no reference or computational details on the underlying principles have been provided. Using the moment carry-over principle and the relative angulation of the brackets, a formula was derived to calculate the relative moments of the two brackets. Because of the moment equilibrium, the vertical forces that exist as a forcecouple on the two brackets can also be calculated. The accuracy of the proposed approach can be validated using previously published empirical data.

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pISSN 2234-7518 eISSN 2005-372X

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